• The Black Book is Orhan Pamuk's tour de force, a stunning tapestry of Middle Eastern and Islamic culture which confirmed his reputation as a writer of international stature. Richly atmospheric and Rabelaisian in scope, it is a labyrinthine novel suffused with the sights, sounds and scents of Istanbul, an unforgettable evocation of the city where East meets West, and a boldly unconventional mystery that plumbs the elusive nature of identity, fiction, interpretation and reality.

  • Anglais Other Colours

    Pamuk Orhan

    Other Colours is a collection of immediate relevance and timeless value, ranging from lyrical autobiography to criticism of literature and culture, from humour to political analysis, from delicate evocations of his friendship with his daughter Ruya to provocative discussions of Eastern and Western art. It also covers Pamuk's recent, high profile, court case. My Father's Suitcase, Pamuk's 2006 Nobel Lecture, a brilliant illumination of what it means to be a writer, completes the selection from a man who is now without doubt one of international literature's most eminent and popular figures.

  • What happens within us when we read a novel? And how does a novel create its unique effects, so distinct from those of a painting, a film, or a poem? In this inspired, thoughtful, deeply personal book, Orhan Pamuk takes us into the worlds of the writer and the reader, revealing their intimate connections. Pamuk draws on Friedrich Schiller's famous distinction between "naive" poets-who write spontaneously, serenely, unselfconsciously-and "sentimental" poets: those who are reflective, emotional, questioning, and alive to the artifice of the written word. Harking back to the beloved novels of his youth and ranging through the work of such writers as Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Stendhal, Flaubert, Proust, Mann, and Naipaul, he explores the oscillation between the naive and the reflective, and the search for an equilibrium, that lie at the center of the novelist's craft. He ponders the novel's visual and sensual power-its ability to conjure landscapes so vivid they can make the here-and-now fade away. In the course of this exploration, he considers the elements of character, plot, time, and setting that compose the "sweet illusion" of the fictional world. Anyone who has known the pleasure of becoming immersed in a novel will enjoy, and learn from, this perceptive book by one of the modern masters of the art.

  • In the late 1590s, the Sultan secretly commissions a great book: a celebration of his life and his empire, to be illuminated by the best artists of the day - in the European manner. At a time of violent fundamentalism, however, this is a dangerous proposition. Even the illustrious circle of artists are not allowed to know for whom they are working. But when one of the miniaturists is murdered, their Master has to seek outside help. Did the dead painter fall victim to professional rivalry, romantic jealousy or religious terror?With the Sultan demanding an answer within three days, perhaps the clue lies somewhere in the half-finished pictures . . . Orhan Pamuk is one of the world's leading contemporary novelists and in My Name is Red, he fashioned an unforgettable tale of suspense, and an artful meditation on love and deception.

  • Anglais Snow

    Pamuk Orhan

    As the snow begins to fall, a journalist arrives in the remote city of Kars on the Turkish border. Kars is a troubled place - there's a suicide epidemic among its young women, Islamists are poised to win the local elections, and the head of the intelligence service is viciously effective. When the growing blizzard cuts off the outside world, the stage is set for a terrible and desperate act . . . Orhan Pamuk's magnificent and bestselling new novel evokes the spiritual fragility of the non-Western world, its ambivalence about the godless West, and its fury.

  • Anglais Istanbul

    Pamuk Orhan

    Turkey's greatest living novelist guides us through the monuments and lost paradises, dilapidated Ottoman villas, back streets and waterways of Istanbul - the city of his birth and the home of his imagination.'An extraordinary and transcendentally beautiful book . . . It is a long time since I have read a book of such crystalline originality, or one that moved me so much.' Katie Hickman'This evocative book succeeds at both its tasks. It is one of the most touching childhood memoirs I have read in a very long time; and it makes me yearn -- more than any glossy tourist brochure could possibly do -- to be once again in Istanbul.' Noel Malcom, Sunday Telegraph'An irresistibly seductive book, and its seduction lies not in the author's self-portrait, but in his poetical identification with Istanbul . . . His novels have already made him celebrated throughout the world, but perhaps he will be longest remembered for this wistful memorial to the city of his heart.' Jan Morris, Guardian'Extraordinary and moving.' Financial Times'A declaration of love.' Sunday Times'Magnificent, elegiac, impressionistic.' Literary Review'This erudite book manages to be an addictive childhood memoir, a museum-in-prose of a city with west in its head but east in its soul, and a study of the alchemy between place and self.' - David Mitchell, Guardian

  • What happens within us when we read a novel? And how does a novel create its unique effects, so distinct from those of a painting, a film, or a poem? Anyone who has known the pleasure of becoming immersed in a novel will enjoy, and learn from, this perceptive essay by one of the modern masters of the art. In this inspired, thoughtful, deeply personal essay, from his Charles Eliot Norton lecture series collected as The Naive and the Sentimental Novelist, Orhan Pamuk takes us into the worlds of the writer and the reader, revealing their intimate connections.



    'He writes with an effortless authority, and deeply literate sophistications.'

    Peter Craven, The Age

  • Anglais Silent House

    Pamuk Orhan

    Never before published in English, Nobel Laureate Orhan Pamuk's second novel is the moving story of a family gathering the summer before the Turkish military coup of 1980.

    In a crumbling mansion in Cennethisar, a former fishing village near Istanbul, the old widow Fatma awaits the annual summer visit of her grandchildren. She has lived in the village for decades, ever since her husband, and idealistic young doctor, first arrived to serve the poor fishermen. Now mostly bedridden, she is attended by her faithful servant Recep, a dwarf and the doctor's illegitimate son. They share memories, and grievances, of the early years, before Cennethisar became a high-class resort.

    Her visiting grandchildren are Faruk, a dissipated failed historian; his sensitive leftist sister, Nilgun; and Metin, a high-school student drawn to the fast life of the nouveaux riches, who dreams of going to America. But it is Recep's nephew Hassan, a high-school dropout, lately fallen in with right-wing nationlaists, who will draw the visiting family into the growing political cataclysm issuing from Turkey's tumultuous century-long struggle for modernity.

    'To read Ramuk is to be converted to the cult of the book.' Jonathan Levi, LA Times Book Review

    'Turkey foremost novelist and one of the most interesting literary figures anywhere . . . A first-rate storyteller.' Times Literary Supplement

  • In an old mansion in Cennethisar, a former fishing village near Istanbul, an old widow Fatma awaits the annual summer visit of her grandchildren. She has lived in the village for decades, ever since her husband, an idealistic young doctor, first arrived to serve the poor fishermen. Now mostly bedridden, she is attended by her faithfulservant Recep, a dwarf and the doctor's illegitimate son. They share memories, and grievances, of the early years, before Cennethisar became a high class resort.Her visiting grandchildren are Faruk, a dissipated failed historian; his sensitive leftist sister, Nilgun; and Metin, a high school student drawn to the fast life of the nouveaux riches, who dreams of going to America. But it is Recep's nephew Hassan, a high school dropout, lately fallen in with right-wing nationalist, who will draw the visiting family into the growing political cataclysm issuing from Turkey's tumultuous century-long struggle for modernity.

  • What happens within us when we read a novel? And how does a novel create its unique effects, so distinct from those of a painting, a film, or a poem? In this inspired, thoughtful, deeply personal book, Orhan Pamuk takes us into the worlds of the writer and the reader, revealing their intimate connections.



    Pamuk draws on Friedrich Schiller's famous distinction between 'naive' poets - who write spontaneously, serenely, unselfconsciously - and 'sentimental' poets: those who are reflective, emotional, questioning, and alive to the artifice of the written word. Harking back to the beloved novels of his youth and ranging through the work of such writers as Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Stendhal, Flaubert, Proust, Mann, and Naipaul, he explores the oscillation between the naive and the reflective, and the search for an equilibrium, that lie at the center of the novelist's craft. He ponders the novel's visual and sensual power - its ability to conjure landscapes so vivid they can make the here-and-now fade away. In the course of this exploration, he considers the elements of character, plot, time, and setting that compose the 'sweet illusion' of the fictional world.



    Anyone who has known the pleasure of becoming immersed in a novel will enjoy, and learn from, this perceptive book by one of the modern masters of the art.

    'He writes with an effortless authority, and deeply literate sophistications.' Peter Craven, The Age

  • The Museum of Innocence - set in Istanbul between 1975 and today - tells the story of Kemal, the son of one of Istanbul's richest families, and of his obsessive love for a poor and distant relation, the beautiful Fusun, who is a shop-girl in a small boutique.The novel depicts a panoramic view of life in Istanbul as it chronicles this long, obsessive, love affair between Kemal and Fusun; and Pamuk beautifully captures the identity crisis esperienced by Istanbul's upper classes who find themselves caught between traditional and westernised ways of being.For the past ten years, Pamuk has been setting up a museum in the house in which his hero's fictional family lived, to display Kemal's strange collection of objects associated with Fusun and their relationship. The museum will be called The Museum of Innocence and it opens in 2010.

  • 'I read a book one day, and my whole life was changed.' So begins The New Life, Orhan Pamuk's fabulous road novel about a young student who yearns for the life promised by a dangerously magical book. He falls in love, abandons his studies, turns his back on home and family, and embarks on restless bus trips through the provinces, in pursuit of an elusive vision. This is a wondrous odyssey, laying bare the rage of an arid heartland. In coffee houses with black-and-white TV sets, on buses where passengers ride watching B-movies on flickering screens, in wrecks along the highway, in paranoid fictions with spies as punctual as watches, the magic of Pamuk's creation comes alive.

  • The White Castle, Orhan Pamuk's celebrated first novel, is the tale of a young Italian scholar captured by pirates and put up for auction at the Istanbul slave market. Acquired by a brilliant Turkish inventor, he is set to work on projects to entertain the jaded Sultan.

  • A Strangeness In My Mind is a novel Orhan Pamuk has worked on for six years. It is the story of boza seller Mevlut, the woman to whom he wrote three years' worth of love letters, and their life in Istanbul. In the four decades between 1969 and 2012, Mevlut works a number of different jobs on the streets of Istanbul, from selling yoghurt and cooked rice, to guarding a car park. He observes many different kinds of people thronging the streets, he watches most of the city get demolished and re-built, and he sees migrants from Anatolia making a fortune; at the same time, he witnesses all of the transformative moments, political clashes, and military coups that shape the country. He always wonders what it is that separates him from everyone else - the source of that strangeness in his mind. But he never stops selling boza during winter evenings and trying to understand who his beloved really is. What matters more in love: what we wish for, or what our fate has in store? Do our choices dictate whether we will be happy or not, or are these things determined by forces beyond our control? A Strangeness In My Mind tries to answer these questions while portraying the tensions between urban life and family life, and the fury and helplessness of women inside their homes.

  • Abandonné par son père, Cem vit seul avec sa mère. Tandis qu'il passe l'été sur le chantier d'un puits avant son entrée à l'université, il voit débarquer une troupe de comédiens. Parmi eux, une femme aux cheveux roux qui le saisit par sa beauté. Malgré leur différence d'âge, une histoire d'amour s'esquisse entre eux. Mais quand un accident survient au puits, l'existence de Cem bascule. Hanté par ce qu'il cherche à enfouir, il va découvrir la force inexorable du destin.
    Faisant résonner les mythes anciens dans la Turquie contemporaine, Orhan Pamuk livre une réflexion magistrale sur les choix de l'existence et la place véritable de la liberté.

  • Comme tant d'autres, Mevlut a quitté son village pour s'installer sur les collines qui bordent Istanbul. Il y vend de la boza, cette boisson fermentée traditionnelle prisée par les Turcs. Mais Istanbul s'étend, le raki détrône la boza, et pendant que ses amis agrandissent leurs maisons et se marient, Mevlut s'entête. Même si ses projets de commerce n'aboutissent pas et que ses lettres d'amour ne semblent jamais parvenir à la bonne destinataire. Il continue d'arpenter les rues comme marchand ambulant, point mobile et privilégié pour saisir un monde en transformation.
    L'histoire poignante d'un homme déterminé à être heureux.

  • Mon nom est Rouge

    Orhan Pamuk

    Istanbul, en cet hiver 1591, est sous la neige. Mais un cadavre, le crâne fracassé, nous parle depuis le puits où il a été jeté. Il connaît son assassin, de même que les raisons du meurtre dont il a été victime : un complot contre l'Empire ottoman, sa culture, ses traditions, et sa peinture. Car les miniaturistes de l'atelier du Sultan, dont il faisait partie, sont chargés d'illustrer un livre à la manière italienne...
    Mon nom est Rouge, roman polyphonique et foisonnant, nous plonge dans l'univers fascinant de l'Empire ottoman de la fin du XVIe siècle, et nous tient en haleine jusqu'à la dernière page par un extraordinaire suspense. Une subtile réflexion sur la confrontation entre Occident et Orient sous-tend cette trame policière, elle-même doublée d'une intrigue amoureuse, dans un récit parfaitement maîtrisé. Un roman d'une force et d'une qualité rares.

  • Neige

    Orhan Pamuk

    Le jeune poète turc Ka - de son vrai nom Kerim Alakusoglu - quitte son exil allemand pour se rendre à Kars, une petite ville provinciale endormie d'Anatolie. Pour le compte d'un journal d'Istanbul, il part enquêter sur plusieurs cas de suicide de jeunes femmes portant le foulard. Mais Ka désire aussi retrouver la belle Ipek, ancienne camarade de faculté fraîchement divorcée de Muhtar, un islamiste candidat à la mairie de Kars.
    À peine arrivé dans la ville de Kars, en pleine effervescence en raison de l'approche d'élections à haut risque, il est l'objet de diverses sollicitudes et se trouve piégé par son envie de plaire à tout le monde : le chef de la police locale, la soeur d'Ipek, adepte du foulard, l'islamiste radical Lazuli vivant dans la clandestinité, ou l'acteur républicain Sunay, tous essaient de gagner la sympathie du poète et de le rallier à leur cause. Mais Ka avance, comme dans un rêve, voyant tout à travers le filtre de son inspiration poétique retrouvée, stimulée par sa passion grandissante pour Ipek, et le voile de neige qui couvre la ville. Jusqu'au soir où la représentation d'une pièce de théâtre kémaliste dirigée contre les extrémistes islamistes se transforme en putsch militaire et tourne au carnage.
    Neige est un extraordinaire roman à suspense qui, tout en jouant habilement avec des sujets d'ordre politique très contemporains - comme l'identité de la société turque et la nature du fanatisme religieux -, surprend par ce ton poétique et nostalgique qui, telle la neige, nimbe chaque page.

  • Istanbul

    Orhan Pamuk

    Évocation d'une ville, roman de formation et réflexion sur la mélancolie, Istanbul est tout cela à la fois. Au gré des pages, Orhan Pamuk se remémore ses promenades d'enfant, à pied, en voiture ou en bateau, et nous entraîne à travers ruelles en pente et jardins, sur les rives du Bosphore, devant des villas décrépites, dessinant ainsi le portrait fascinant d'une métropole en déclin.
    Ancienne capitale d'un vaste empire, Istanbul se cherche une identité, entre tradition et modernité, religion et laïcité, et les changements qui altèrent son visage n'échappent pas au regard de l'écrivain, fin connaisseur de son histoire, d'autant que ces transformations accompagnent une autre déchirure, bien plus intime et douloureuse, celle provoquée par la lente désagrégation de la famille Pamuk - une famille dont les membres, grands-parents, oncles et tantes, ont tous vécus dans le même immeuble - et par la dérive à la fois financière et affective de ses parents.
    Dans cette oeuvre foisonnante, magistralement composée et richement illustrée, Orhan Pamuk nous propose de remonter avec lui le temps de son éducation sentimentale et, in fine, de lire le roman de la naissance d'un écrivain.

  • Kemal, un jeune homme d'une trentaine d'années, est promis à Sibel, issue comme lui de la bonne bourgeoisie stambouliote, quand il rencontre Füsun, une parente éloignée et plutôt pauvre. Il tombe fou amoureux de la jeune fille, et sous prétexte de lui donner des cours de mathématiques, la retrouve tous les jours dans l'appartement vide de sa mère. En même temps, il est incapable de renoncer à sa liaison avec Sibel.
    C'est seulement quand Füsun disparaît, après les fiançailles entre Sibel et Kemal célébrées en grande pompe, que ce dernier comprend à quel point il l'aime. Kemal rend alors visite à sa famille et emporte une simple réglette lui ayant appartenu : ce sera la première pièce du musée qu'il consacrera à son amour disparu. Puis, il avoue tout à Sibel et rompt les fiançailles.
    Quand, quelque temps après, Kemal retrouve la trace de Füsun, mariée à son ami d'enfance Feridun, son obsession pour la jeune femme montera encore d'un cran...
    Le musée de l'innocence est un grand roman nostalgique sur l'amour, le désir et l'absence, une nouvelle preuve de l'immense talent de l'écrivain turc, prix Nobel de Littérature.

  • Le livre noir

    Orhan Pamuk

    Pendant une semaine, jour et nuit dans Istanbul, un jeune avocat, Galip, part à la recherche de sa femme Ruya, qu'il aime depuis l'enfance, et qui lui a laissé une lettre mystérieuse : est-ce un jeu ? un adieu ? Dans le fol espoir de la retrouver, il fouille ses souvenirs et le passé militant de Ruya. Il lit et relit les écrits de Djélâl, le demi-frère de sa femme - un homme secret qu'il admire. Mais lui aussi semble avoir disparu. À la recherche des deux êtres qu'il aime, Galip est en même temps en quête de sa propre identité et, bientôt, de celle d'Istanbul, présentée ici sous un aspect singulier : toujours enneigée, boueuse et ambiguë, insaisissable.

  • Un tout petit port turc, désert l'hiver, envahi par les touristes l'été. À l'écart des luxueuses villas des nouveaux riches, une maison tombant en ruine. Un nain y veille sur une très vieille femme, qui passe ses jours et ses nuits à évoquer sa jeunesse et à ressasser ses griefs. Ils vivent côte à côte dans le silence sur les secrets qu'ils partagent, dans la haine et la solitude. Comme chaque été, les trois petits-enfants de la vieille dame viennent passer quelques jours chez elle : un intellectuel désabusé et alcoolique, une étudiante progressiste et idéaliste, un lycéen arriviste, rêvant de la réussite à l'américaine. Leur séjour sera bref et se terminera par un drame, causé autant par les conditions politiques des années 1975-1980 que par le passé de la famille.
    Le récit dresse un tableau lucide de l'histoire des cent dernières années de la Turquie qui pose adroitement une question très actuelle pour les pays du Proche-Orient : l'occidentalisation a-t-elle échoué ? Quels en ont été les résultats, quelle est la part de cette évolution dans les conflits de générations comme dans les rapports droite-gauche en politique ?
    Un beau roman. Un écrivain sensible, qui sait raconter une histoire.

  • Cevdet Bey et ses fils

    Orhan Pamuk

    C'est dans le quartier occidental de Nisantasi que Cevdet Bey, un riche marchand musulman, s'installe avec son épouse pour fonder une famille. Nous sommes en 1905 et le sultan Abdülhamid II vient d'échapper à un attentat. Les élites turques contestent de plus en plus fortement le règne despotique des dirigeants ottomans, le pays se trouve alors à un tournant historique que Cevdet a pour projet de relater dans ses Mémoires. Trente ans plus tard, la Turquie n'est en effet plus la même après la réforme du régime politique, le bouleversement des moeurs, et la mise en place d'un nouvel alphabet.
    Les fils de Cevdet Bey en profitent pour prendre des directions différentes dans ce pays gagné par la modernité. Et c'est à la troisième génération, en 1970, qu'un besoin de retour vers les origines vient sceller cette fresque turque. Ahmet, qui est artiste-peintre, s'attaque au portrait de son grand-père, mort dans les années soixante, et ainsi à celui de toute une nation...
    Cevdet Bey et ses fils est le premier roman écrit par Orhan Pamuk. Toute son oeuvre affleure déjà dans cette immense fresque à trois temps qui dépeint magistralement l'émergence d'une Turquie moderne, thème qu'il déclinera sans cesse dans la suite de sa production littéraire.

  • Le château blanc

    Orhan Pamuk

    Le narrateur est un Italien de vingt ans, féru d'astronomie et de mathématiques. Capturé par des marins turcs et jeté dans la prison d'Istanbul, il se dit médecin, et est offert comme esclave à un hodja, un savant. Le maître oriental et l'esclave occidental se ressemblent de manière effrayante, éprouvent une méfiance immédiate l'un pour l'autre. Mais ils ne se séparent pas, vivent ensemble, travaillent ensemble, quotidiennement, d'abord sur la pyrotechnie, ensuite sur une horloge, enfin sur une redoutable machine de guerre pour Mehmet IV, dit le Chasseur, sultan de 1648 à 1687. Ensemble encore, ils contribuent à l'éradication d'une épidémie de peste. Tantôt dominant, tantôt dominé, des années durant, chacun raconte sa vie à l'autre. Puis les deux doubles doivent s'engager, avec leur machine de guerre, dans la désastreuse campagne polonaise. Mise à l'essai sur un château blanc, la machine ne fonctionne pas. Craignant pour sa vie, le Maître usurpe l'identité, la personnalité et le passé du narrateur. Celui-ci reste à Istanbul, devient le Maître. Des années plus tard, il entend parler de l'Autre, comme d'un ancien esclave capturé par des marins turcs, et qui s'est évadé...

empty